Ballot

Special Councilor - Clinical Anatomical Services (you will vote for one)
Koichi Watanabe

Natalie Langley
Estomih Mtui                                                                                    

Article VII - Nominations and Elections

President-Elect (you will vote for one)

Rob Spinner (University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health)

Biography: After graduating valedictorian from high school in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, Dr. Jennifer Burgoon attended Baldwin-Wallace University (BWU) where she discovered her passion for anatomy.  She graduated from BWU summa cum laude with a B.S. in Biology and a minor in Chemistry in 1996.  She then worked as a research technician (i.e., primarily as a histologist) at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation until she started graduate school at The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) in 1997.  Dr. Burgoon earned her M.S. in Cell Biology and Anatomy in August 2001 and her Ph.D. in Education, with an emphasis on educational psychology, measurement, and evaluation, in August 2008.  While in graduate school, Dr. Burgoon worked as a teaching assistant and tutor for the medical gross anatomy course, a guest lecturer for the medical embryology course, a research assistant for the Center for Mathematics and Science Education, and as a Project Coordinator for a Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) Grant.  She was very active in multiple student organizations including the National Association of Graduate and Professional Students (NAGPS), where she served as a Regional Coordinator and Ombuds Coordinator, as well as serving as Graduate Student Attorney General for the UNC-CH Student Judicial Office.  During the last three years of her Ph.D. program, Dr. Burgoon taught multiple undergraduate anatomy courses as an instructor during the regular school year for the Department of Biology at Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois, as well as taught a large-enrollment undergraduate anatomy & physiology course as a visiting lecturer during the summers for the UNC-CH Department of Biology in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

In August of 2008, Dr. Burgoon accepted a position as assistant professor within the Division of Anatomy at The Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus, Ohio.  At that time, her primary role was to teach a large-enrollment undergraduate anatomy course with cadaveric prosection to 256 students during three quarters.  Since that time, she was named the Director of Undergraduate Education and that one undergraduate course has grown to upwards of 700 students per semester.  Her teaching role expanded and now includes: 1.) graduate histology; 2.) the histology component of the dental anatomy course; 3.) some of the medical histology components, 4.) a post-baccalaureate gross anatomy course for incoming professional students; and 5.) two graduate anatomy seminars – one on teaching and one on research.  Dr. Burgoon plays a key role in the growth and improvement of courses within the Division of Anatomy and the College of Medicine.  She is involved in curricular revision and course development for the Division of Anatomy, as well as served as Co-Chair of the Evaluation and Assessment Team, a member of The Curriculum Implementation Team, and an Expert Educator during the development and implementation of the new curriculum [i.e., Lead.Serve.Inspire (LSI)] at the OSU College of Medicine.

Dr. Burgoon’s established research focus continues to be on the anatomical self-efficacy and developing teaching resources, as well as examining the role of undergraduate anatomy education in the preparation of students for professional programs.  She was recently selected as member of the first cohort of Digital Flagship Educators at OSU, a cohort that will be pushing education forward with the incorporation of innovative technology in the classroom.                    

Dr. Burgoon embodies the service mission of the university in her involvement on a number of local and national committees, including the 2017 and 2018 Annual Meeting Co-Chair for the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and Lead of the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS) Anatomy & Physiology Testing Panel.  

Statement: It is truly an honor to be nominated to serve as Program Secretary of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA).  Since joining the AACA in 2002, it has been an honor to have served the AACA in a number of roles including as a member and chair of the Bylaws Committee and as a member and chair of the Educational Affairs Committee.  Additionally, it has been a tremendous opportunity to learn about the activities required to plan and execute the AACA’s Annual Scientific Meeting as the 2017 and 2018 Annual Meeting Co-Chair, under the direction of the current Program Secretary David Porta.  I know this position will require a substantial time commitment, but I am truly committed to this endeavor knowing the importance of the annual meeting.  Besides working with the AACA’s Annual Scientific Meeting, I have also run a number of other local, regional, and national meetings.  For example, I am currently serving as the co-chair for the 2018 National Meeting of the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS).  During graduate school, I also planned and ran a number of regional and national meetings for the National Association of Graduate and Professional Students (NAGPS).

I wish to continue my service to this wonderful community of colleagues and friends in an effort to make the AACA Annual Scientific Meetings the best possible.  Finally, thank you for your consideration!  I look forward to seeing everyone at the 2018 AACA Annual Scientific Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia!          

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Jon Wisco (Brigham Young University)

 

Statement: I am privileged to be associated with you – a society of extraordinarily talented individuals. We are clinical anatomists – content and skill experts in fields of medicine rooted in the anatomical sciences. We are mentors – advisors to one another in vertical and horizontal relationships that help add value to our respective careers. We are a community – individuals across the world working and supporting one another in a network to magnify the discipline of clinical anatomy to scientific and non-scientific audiences. I am most proud of the fact that above all else, we care – about our discipline, and about each other. For these reasons, I am honored to be nominated for the position of President-Elect.

Our most recent mission statement expresses that “The American Association of Clinical Anatomists is the international home for the advancement of clinical anatomy knowledge and anatomical services through education, research and scholarship.” The quality of our annual meetings, mentoring relationships, and journal publications have all increased because as an Association family, we have worked together to make the AACA our professional home. I have witnessed that first hand working as a member or Chair of various committees including Financial Affairs, Career Development, Publicity ad hoc, Annual Meeting Planning, Meeting and Oversight Program Planning (MOPP), Regional Meeting Planning, Brand Promotion and Outreach, and most recently the Clinical Anatomy Certification Program Committee. I can attest that we have incredible members collaborating for the betterment of our discipline and profession. The fruits of our labors are evident in the personal progress of our membership: It has been fun and exciting to see and hear of your successes, particularly at the annual and regional meetings.

The backbone of our success as clinical anatomists, mentors and community is the mentoring relationships that have been formed and are sustained through our various interest groups. We gather at annual and regional meetings to invigorate those relationships. I have especially enjoyed the increased student involvement in the Association and am committed to fostering those relationships. I am also dedicated to strengthening our relationships with our sister anatomical sciences societies, and fostering ties with clinical, education, and art societies.

I am honored with the consideration to serve in the responsibility, capacity and tradition of representing the AACA to do our most important work – strengthening our core of members and building bridges with our colleagues. We have a bright future ahead. Thank you so much for your consideration.

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Treasurer (you will vote for one)

Tom Gest - Unopposed - (Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center - Paul L. Foster School of Medicine)

Biography: After graduating valedictorian from high school in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, Dr. Jennifer Burgoon attended Baldwin-Wallace University (BWU) where she discovered her passion for anatomy.  She graduated from BWU summa cum laude with a B.S. in Biology and a minor in Chemistry in 1996.  She then worked as a research technician (i.e., primarily as a histologist) at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation until she started graduate school at The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) in 1997.  Dr. Burgoon earned her M.S. in Cell Biology and Anatomy in August 2001 and her Ph.D. in Education, with an emphasis on educational psychology, measurement, and evaluation, in August 2008.  While in graduate school, Dr. Burgoon worked as a teaching assistant and tutor for the medical gross anatomy course, a guest lecturer for the medical embryology course, a research assistant for the Center for Mathematics and Science Education, and as a Project Coordinator for a Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) Grant.  She was very active in multiple student organizations including the National Association of Graduate and Professional Students (NAGPS), where she served as a Regional Coordinator and Ombuds Coordinator, as well as serving as Graduate Student Attorney General for the UNC-CH Student Judicial Office.  During the last three years of her Ph.D. program, Dr. Burgoon taught multiple undergraduate anatomy courses as an instructor during the regular school year for the Department of Biology at Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois, as well as taught a large-enrollment undergraduate anatomy & physiology course as a visiting lecturer during the summers for the UNC-CH Department of Biology in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

In August of 2008, Dr. Burgoon accepted a position as assistant professor within the Division of Anatomy at The Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus, Ohio.  At that time, her primary role was to teach a large-enrollment undergraduate anatomy course with cadaveric prosection to 256 students during three quarters.  Since that time, she was named the Director of Undergraduate Education and that one undergraduate course has grown to upwards of 700 students per semester.  Her teaching role expanded and now includes: 1.) graduate histology; 2.) the histology component of the dental anatomy course; 3.) some of the medical histology components, 4.) a post-baccalaureate gross anatomy course for incoming professional students; and 5.) two graduate anatomy seminars – one on teaching and one on research.  Dr. Burgoon plays a key role in the growth and improvement of courses within the Division of Anatomy and the College of Medicine.  She is involved in curricular revision and course development for the Division of Anatomy, as well as served as Co-Chair of the Evaluation and Assessment Team, a member of The Curriculum Implementation Team, and an Expert Educator during the development and implementation of the new curriculum [i.e., Lead.Serve.Inspire (LSI)] at the OSU College of Medicine.

Dr. Burgoon’s established research focus continues to be on the anatomical self-efficacy and developing teaching resources, as well as examining the role of undergraduate anatomy education in the preparation of students for professional programs.  She was recently selected as member of the first cohort of Digital Flagship Educators at OSU, a cohort that will be pushing education forward with the incorporation of innovative technology in the classroom.                    

Dr. Burgoon embodies the service mission of the university in her involvement on a number of local and national committees, including the 2017 and 2018 Annual Meeting Co-Chair for the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and Lead of the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS) Anatomy & Physiology Testing Panel.  

Statement: It is truly an honor to be nominated to serve as Program Secretary of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA).  Since joining the AACA in 2002, it has been an honor to have served the AACA in a number of roles including as a member and chair of the Bylaws Committee and as a member and chair of the Educational Affairs Committee.  Additionally, it has been a tremendous opportunity to learn about the activities required to plan and execute the AACA’s Annual Scientific Meeting as the 2017 and 2018 Annual Meeting Co-Chair, under the direction of the current Program Secretary David Porta.  I know this position will require a substantial time commitment, but I am truly committed to this endeavor knowing the importance of the annual meeting.  Besides working with the AACA’s Annual Scientific Meeting, I have also run a number of other local, regional, and national meetings.  For example, I am currently serving as the co-chair for the 2018 National Meeting of the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS).  During graduate school, I also planned and ran a number of regional and national meetings for the National Association of Graduate and Professional Students (NAGPS).

I wish to continue my service to this wonderful community of colleagues and friends in an effort to make the AACA Annual Scientific Meetings the best possible.  Finally, thank you for your consideration!  I look forward to seeing everyone at the 2018 AACA Annual Scientific Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia!          

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Special Councilor - Clinical Anatomical Services (you will vote for one)

Koichi Watanabe (Kurume University School of Medicine)

BiographyScott T. Barton is the Director of Anatomical Services at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine, where he interacts with medial and pre-professional students, residents, fellows, and faculty from 18 departments and 78 residency and fellowship programs.  Scott’s work supports and facilitates the education and research activities at UCSD and beyond through the management of a whole-body donation program of more than 450 annual donations. He is a well-respected member of the University of California Anatomical Donation Program team who is active on his home campus and throughout the UC system.

Scott has two Associate of Applied Sciences degrees in Airway Sciences and Funeral Service Education.  He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology with an emphasis in Anatomy and Physiology and a Master’s degree in Business Administration with an emphasis on Public Administration.  During his time with UCSD, Scott has completed the requirements to earn a PhD in Organizational Leadership and Development and he is scheduled to defend his thesis titled “The Impact of Professional Association Involvement on Job Satisfaction and Performance in Academic Anatomical Materials Personnel” in December 2018.

Scott joined the American Association of Clinical Anatomists in 2012.  He has presented and supported his staff in four AACA presentations and served as a judge. In addition, he has presented at other association conferences, both nationally and internationally. He invented an embalming device, which UCSD patented, to limit cadaver forearm pronation.  He is also a member of the American Association of Anatomists, the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society, the Cremation Association of North America, UCSD’s Institutional Biosafety Committee, and UCSD’s Human Anatomical Specimen and Tissue Oversight Committee.  

Scott was a full time faculty member at Lake Washington Institute of Technology in Kirkland, Washington, in the Funeral Services Education Program. He also taught at Mt. Hood Community College in Gresham, Oregon and worked in the funeral industry.  He served as an Air Traffic Controller during his United States Air Force military service.

Statement: It is an honor to be nominated for the position of Special Counselor - Anatomical Services within the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA).  If elected I will graciously accept this position to serve AACA membership and specifically the Anatomical Services Special Interest Group and Committee.  In my current role I serve in the field of anatomical services as an educator, researcher, and administrator.  I understand the vital role that members of anatomical services programs provide in both the didactic and clinical education of anatomy.  Because of this critical role it is important for anatomical services to have strong representation on the council.  There are increasingly varied legal and ethical concerns surrounding the use of human anatomical specimens that have an impact on educational institutions.

AACA is a great resource to the members of the anatomical services field.  I have gained a great deal of knowledge interacting with members of AACA which has allowed me to grow both personally and professionally.  My knowledge and experience will help me to serve as an advocate for anatomical services while interacting with other council members.  I will continue to work to uphold the integrity of our field in caring for those who donate to medical education and research while serving in this role.  Thank you for your consideration.

Councilor-at-Large (you can vote for two)

Nirusha Lachman (Mayo Clinic School of Medicine)

Biography: Dr. Dolgor Baatar is an Assistant Professor in Medical Education at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at El Paso (TTUHSCEP), Paul L Foster School of Medicine (PLFSOM). He was born and raised in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. In 1989, Dr. Baatar received his MD Diploma with honors from the First Moscow State Medical University, the oldest and most prestigious medical school in Russia. After completion of a residency program in General Surgery, Dr. Baatar taught and practiced surgery at the Health Sciences University of Mongolia (HSUM).

In 2001, Dr. Baatar received his PhD degree in Physiology from the Oita Medical University, Japan. As a PhD student, he studied the pathogenesis of portal hypertension and mechanisms of gastrointestinal ulcer healing. Dr. Baatar received his postdoctoral training at the Department of Gastroenterology, University of California, Irvine and at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), NIH. While working at NIA Dr. Baatar generated a novel anti-tumor compound which was granted a US patent in 2014.

In 2011 Dr. Baatar was recruited by the TTUHSCEP as an Assistant Professor in Medical Education. Dr. Baatar teaches anatomy, physiology and immunology as well as clinical skills. He is also a director of the Scientific Principles of Medicine Course and the Surgical Anatomy elective course. To enhance the clinical relevance of the anatomy curriculum, Dr. Baatar introduced teaching of clinical procedures during anatomy labs and developed a series of clinical case-based anatomy sessions. In 2017 in recognition of his teaching efforts, Dr. Baatar received the Faculty Excellence Award from the TTUHSC El Paso Student Government Association (SGA). Dr. Baatar is a member of the Texas State Anatomical Board.

Statement: It is a great honor to be nominated to the AACA Councilor-at-Large position. Since joining the AACA in 2013, I served for 2 years in the Career Development Committee and am currently serving on the Brand Promotion, Outreach Committee (since 2016), and the Educational Affairs Committee (since 2017).

As a former surgeon, I believe that the clinical aspect of anatomy education in the US still needs improvement. Anatomy educators need to integrate the basic science anatomy curriculum with what clinical educators expect from their students. A better knowledge of the clinical needs of students can be used to adapt teaching to help students meet ever-changing expectations. If elected as a Councilor-at-Large of the AACA, I would strive to establish a productive relationship with associations of clinical educators such as the Association of Surgical Education. This may help us to recruit more clinicians to the AACA and increase the number of clinical presentations at our meetings. Further, we should encourage and assist our members in promoting the AACA at meetings of clinical associations and societies.

Thank you for considering my candidacy for this position. I believe that I can bring a unique perspective to the AACA Council as a clinician, researcher, educator, and administrator.

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Estomih Mtui (Weill Cornel Medical College) 

Biography: Dr. Sarah Greene graduated from Johnson State College in Johnson, VT in 2003 with a B.S. in Health Science.  She then went onto attend the University of New England in Biddeford, ME, where she received a B.S. in Medical Biology in 2005.  She went on to earn her Ph.D. in Anatomy and Neurobiology in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) in 2010.  Her research at BUSM focused on studying neuroimaging and neuropsychological biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease.  She also participated in the Vesalius Program, where she received training to become an educator in the biomedical sciences.  During her time as a graduate student, she served as a teaching assistant in gross anatomy for medical and dental students, and also in neuroscience for medical students.

Dr. Greene began her academic career as a lecturer and laboratory instructor in gross anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.  She accepted her first full time faculty position as a lecturer in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology in the College of Medicine at University of Vermont (UVM; now the Robert Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont) in 2010.  Soon after she began in her position at UVM, she received the Rising Star Young Alumni Award from Johnson State College.  She later became an assistant professor in the new, merged Department of Neurological Sciences at UVM.  During her time at UVM, she taught in gross anatomy and neuroscience courses for physical therapy and medical students, and developed and directed a Clinical Anatomy elective course for 4th year medical students.  She also served as the Director of the Anatomical Gift Program.   

Dr. Greene accepted a position as an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology and Anatomy at Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in 2015. She primarily teaches in the gross anatomy and embryology components of the Organ Systems 1, 2, and 3 courses.  She serves on several institutional committees at MSM, including acting as a co-chair for the Pre-Clinical Course Review Subcommittee for the Curriculum and Evaluation Committee.  She recently began the role of Director of the Body Donor Program.  In 2017, she received the award for Best Academic Professor at the Faculty Appreciation Gala at MSM.

Although Dr. Greene began her research in basic science, she transitioned to focus on educational research after graduate school.  Her most recent research projects have involved evaluating student responses to dissection and finding the most appropriate and effective methods for assisting students with transitioning to working with anatomical body donors, and also developing and evaluating new methods and technology in teaching anatomy.  She and her co-authors recently published an article (currently in press) relating to the importance of a donor memorial ceremony to the students and families of anatomical donors in Medical Science Educator.

Outside of her service at MSM, Dr. Greene has also been active in the American Association of Clinical Anatomists.  She has served as a member of, and currently chairs the Career Development Committee.  She was an interim member of the Educational Affairs Committee for one year.  She will also serve as the 2018-19 Meeting Manager for the AACA.  Finally, MSM is the host institution for the 2018 AACA meeting, and therefore she has been involved in assisting with planning the meeting from this perspective as well.  Additionally, she is completing her third and final year of serving on the Committee for Early Career Anatomists for the American Association of Anatomists.

Statement: It is an incredible honor to receive the nomination to serve as a Councilor-at-Large for the American Association of Clinical Anatomists.  I joined AACA many years ago as a graduate student, and being involved in the AACA has been imperative to my growth as an educator and researcher in education, and I am excited to have the opportunity to further serve in this association.  I have very much enjoyed chairing the Career Development Committee for the AACA for the past several years, as it has provided me the opportunity to work with the Committee members to plan events that encourage networking and development of professionals in the early stages of their careers.  I believe that my current and past experiences serving on committees for the AACA, as well as becoming a meeting manager for the 2018-19 meeting has provided me with the background, skills, and understanding of the time commitment necessary to serve as a Councilor-at-Large.  Thank you for your consideration for this position, and I look forward to the opportunity to see all of you here in Atlanta in July!

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Natalie Langley (Mayo Clinic School of Medicine) 

Biography: Natalie Langley, PhD, D-ABFA, is Associate Professor of Anatomy and Associate Director of Curriculum Management and Faculty Development in the Office of Applied Scholarship and Education Science (OASES) in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. She currently teaches gross anatomy, embryology, and histology at the Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine in Scottsdale, AZ, in addition to cadaveric-based CME and resident education courses. Dr. Langley is a summa cum laude graduate of Louisiana State University where she received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and German (1998). She received her Master of Arts in Anthropology from Louisiana State University (2001) and her PhD in Anthropology at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (2009), also summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa. She is a board-certified Forensic Anthropologist trained in anatomy, skeletal biology, biological anthropology, forensic anthropology, and education science.

Dr. Langley has 13 years of teaching experience and curriculum development in various courses at the high school, undergraduate, graduate, and medical school educational levels (human osteology, biological anthropology, forensic anthropology, gross anatomy, anatomy of medical imaging, histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, and teaching methods and curriculum development in the anatomical sciences). She has directed several programs, including a Master of Anatomical Sciences program, Clinical Anatomy doctoral program, Advanced Anatomy Fellowship, and a pre-matriculation Anatomy Boot Camp. She has received over $1,500,000 in federal funding from the National Institute of Justice for her forensic research, and has consulted for the Georgia Bureau of Investigation and the US Department of Justice’s International Training Assistance Program in Bogota, Colombia. Dr. Langley has mentored students and postdoctoral fellows in the US, and internationally, on research and development in forensic anthropology, clinical anatomy, and medical education. She has published numerous articles, book chapters, two textbooks, and a laboratory manual, and also serves as a reviewer for a number of scientific journals.

Dr. Langley is a Fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, and a member of the American Association of Anatomists and American Association of Clinical Anatomists. She serves on committees  and participates in the abstract review and award judging processes for each of these organizations. She is also an item writer for the American Board of Forensic Anthropology (ABFA) board examination, and serves on the ABFA Examination Validation Committee.  Dr. Langley has been recognized for excellence in teaching and received the Emerging Forensic Scientist Award for her research in skeletal maturation.

Personal Statement

I am honored to be nominated to serve the American Association of Clinical Anatomists as Councilor-at-Large. I take service positions seriously and enjoy collaborating with and learning from colleagues in this capacity. I currently serve on the Career Development Committee, and I appreciate working with other AACA members to promote the association’s goals to maintain high professional standards in the teaching of anatomy and dissemination of clinical anatomy research. I have pursued other opportunities to serve the Association, including judging and moderating at meetings. On a personal note, the AACA meetings and the society’s membership serve a meaningful role in my professional development as an anatomist.

I value the friends, collaborators, and mentors I have met through the AACA and regularly bring new members to the annual meetings to share the experience. My experiences as an educator, mentor, researcher, and administrator provide me with diverse skills for service positions, including leadership, organization, communication, and teamwork. My service experience in professional associations includes abstract review committees, award committees, ad hoc investigative committees, and career development committees. I welcome this opportunity to become further involved in the AACA and return the favor of the members who welcomed me and continue to play a vital role in my personal and professional development. If elected, I would ensure that this spirit of community is maintained among our membership while promoting all aspects of clinical anatomy—research, education, and training.

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Article VII - Nominations and Elections

Section 2. Nomination by Petition. Members may petition for additional candidates to be added to the 2018 AACA Election Ballot. Such nomination petitions may consist of either a single document or separate letters. To qualify for nomination by petition, each candidate must be an Active Full Member and have the support of at least 15 Full Members in good standing. All petitions and/or letters of nomination plus a letter from the nominee indicating his or her willingness to be a candidate must be received by the Association Secretary, Dr. Peter Ward (pward@osteo.wvsom.edu), before midnight Eastern Standard Time (GMT minus 5 hours) on March 31st. When additional valid nominations have been received from the membership, the Association will post a revised list of the candidates for each position subject to election and other such supportive materials to the Association's website by April 15th.

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